"I'm sick but I'm pretty"

"I will kiss you like forgiveness. You / will hold me like I’m hope. Our arms / will bandage and we will press promises / between us like flowers in a book."

J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” novels have a great many concerns that express the series’ larger themes of fascism, democracy and diversity. Among them is the struggle for the rights of house-elves, who play an enormous role in the functioning of the wizarding world even as they reap almost none of the rewards of the magical economy.

The house-elves emerge as characters in the “Harry Potter” novels much in the same way that children themselves might become aware of the workings of the economy as a whole. When Rowling’s characters initially enroll in Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, they think certain things there come to pass by magic. Food appears, beautifully prepared, on dinner tables. Beds are made, fires are lit.

But Harry and his friends Ron and Hermione come to learn that most of these tasks are performed by house-elves, who work not just at Hogwarts but in the homes of many wizarding families. In almost all cases, they are bound to their employers by magic, which is convenient for wizards in two ways: They can force these virtual slaves to do even the most dangerous and disagreeable tasks, and they can do it without paying the house-elves.

Ultimately Harry, Hermione and Ron decide that their concern for non-magical persons and certain classes of magical beings means that they must become advocates for house-elves’ rights as well.

But that is not the end of their education. They also learn that if you want to help people, you have to listen to what they want and need and respect their wishes. When the main characters in Rowling’s series inadvertently free a house-elf named Winky from her rigid wizard employer, they are initially surprised when she is devastated and becomes an alcoholic. The wizards saw her release as a simple matter of her rights, but Winky lost her home and what she perceived to be her family. Instead of just forcing her out of bad conditions, Harry, Hermione and Ron needed to convince Winky that a new kind of life would be better and then deliver on their promises.

And at the end of the “Harry Potter” novels, the three young characters get a powerful illustration of what solidarity really means.

Let’s play out the scenario for the one in millions chance that someone in the presence of someone who wants to assault her is wearing the nail polish, coyly gets her finger into the drink, and spots the color change. Then what? How does it end? If this person is willing to go to such lengths to harm her, they won’t be phased by her setting her drink down. So let’s say she gets away or finds help. Does she call the police to report the activity of her fingernails? What happens when the next person this predator wants to harm opts for her favorite OPI shade that weekend?

How does it end?

It doesn’t; not with nail polish, anyway.

(…)This product does nothing to dismantle a culture of violence against women that demands we constantly become ever more vigilant against those who would do us harm. Undercover Colors, like so many other products, treats rape as an individual incident rather than a systemic and pervasive problem. Despite the never ending stream of prevention products, the statistics haven’t improved.

Unfortunately, This Magical Anti-Rape Nail Polish Won’t Save Us

(x)

(Source: safercampus, via feminismandtea)

jamesdeenhateclub:

Tura Satana appreciation post. here’s what u need to know:

  • born in 1938 and died in 2011
  • her parents were a silent movie actor and a circus performer
  • she was gang-raped by five men when she was ten. they were never prosecuted and it was rumoured that the judge was paid off.
  • this prompted her to train in various martial arts (such as aikido and karate)
  • over the next 15 years, she hunted down each of her rapists and exacted revenge against them. they never even knew who she was until she told them
  • at the same time, she formed an all-woman gang called “the angeles”
  • "we had leather motorcycle jackets, jeans and boots and we kicked butt."
  • moved to los angeles when she was 15 and supported herself
  • dated elvis presley and turned down a marriage proposal from him
  • her most famous film role was in 1965, as varla, a “very aggressive and sexual female character”, in faster, pussycat! kill! kill! (a film that was “an ode to female violence”)
  • Tura was responsible for her own costume, makeup, use of martial arts, and much of her dialouge. she also performed all her own stunts and fight scenes
  • was known for not taking shit from anyone. russ meyer, the director for faster, pussycat! kill!, said of her “[tura was] extremely capable. she knew how to handle herself. don’t fuck with her! and if you have to fuck her, do it well! she might turn on you!”

(via she-is-glue)

time-is-a-many-splendored-thing:

douglasmurphy:

rainbowcoffin:

c-h-0-w:

nightwife:

Always reblog

Woah

well he really should have worn more protective clothing if he didn’t want that to happensounds to me like he was asking for it

Are we really sure he was actually shot and decapitated? Idk, sounds like something he would’ve made up. Guys make false decapitation accusations all the time, you know. 

If he didn’t want to be decapitated, he shouldn’t have worn a shirt that showed off his neck

time-is-a-many-splendored-thing:

douglasmurphy:

rainbowcoffin:

c-h-0-w:

nightwife:

Always reblog

Woah

well he really should have worn more protective clothing if he didn’t want that to happen
sounds to me like he was asking for it

Are we really sure he was actually shot and decapitated? Idk, sounds like something he would’ve made up. Guys make false decapitation accusations all the time, you know. 

If he didn’t want to be decapitated, he shouldn’t have worn a shirt that showed off his neck

(Source: suzziepsyche, via elsieviolet)